I'm Emily, a freelance producer with a background in logistics producing, script development, and design. I graduated from NYU in Fall 2020 with a B.F.A. in Film and TV and a minor in Web Applications and Programming. I was a Tisch Scholarship recipient, and I graduated on the Dean's List with honors.

In 2017, I graduated from Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, where I took the lead in 2 major projects that upped the game for the fledgling film department. As a junior, I co-founded and ran the first Pegasus Film Festival, a statewide high school film festival that is still running. As a senior, I collaborated with the citywide Aurora Lights and Sound Festival to develop a projection art series, and I led a build crew to create installations.

At NYU, I produced 6 undergraduate thesis films, 3 independent shorts, 2 music videos, and a web series. I also held a development internship for 3 semesters, and I worked on-campus in Tisch for 3 years in the undergraduate film department. I've since worked part time for NYU, assisting the Associate Chair of Production with COVID-19 production coordination. I currently work full-time as a Coordinator for Washington Square Films.

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01

16 min NYU undergraduate thesis filmnarrativecoming-of-ageLGBTQ+

02

19 min NYU undergraduate thesis filmnarrativedance/period drama

03

6 min NYU intermediate filmexperimentalcoming-of-sexual ageLGBTQ+

04

18 min NYU undergraduate thesis filmnarrativedrama/thriller

05

15 min NYU undergraduatre thesis filmnarrativesci-fi/thriller

Elliotland

dir. Josh Whalen

prod. myself, Shubhi Shekhar, & Alina Olnick

queer coming-of-age narrative thesis film


view project

All Night Long

dir. Michael Klubeck

prod. myself, Heather Vaxer, Simon Geisker, & Anne Swenson

dance/period narrative thesis film


view project

Oh Yeah

dir. Lilena Marinou

prod. myself & Kara Bartek

queer experimental film


view project

Meet the Neighbors

dir. Derin Egrikavuk

prod. myself, Alex Zinn, Pinar Binay, & Sofia Bara

thriller narrative thesis film


view project

Techno Scrap

dir. Julian Alvarez

prod. myself & Kara Bartek

sci-fi/drama narrative thesis film


view project

COLLAB

Emily Miller

[email protected]

+1 469 426 1004

Elliotland

written and directed by JOSH WHALEN

Isolated by his own secrets, eleven-year-old Elliot finds a perfect, readymade kingdom within McMansions abandoned during the 2008 financial crash. When runaway Lucas arrives, Elliot—at first happy for the company—becomes terrified as Lucas uncovers everything Elliot wants to hide.

AWARDS

3RD PLACE,

First Run Film Festival (2020)

CREDITS

writer/director

JOSH WHALEN

producers

MYSELF,
SHUBHI SHEKHAR,
& ALINA OLNICK

assistant director

EMMI SHOCKLEY

director of photography

JULIAN ALVAREZ

sound mixer

LORENZO CONTI

1st a.c.

CHRISTINE ETTER

script supervisor

ALINA OLNICK

key grip

ISAAC OGLE

grip/gaff

TARIQ GORDON

grip/gaff

TATE SHOCKLEY

production designer

LAUREL BURGHAM

art director

KAITLYN O'BRYON

art assistant

THEA VARLEY

production assistant

CECELIA BONNER


editor

GREYSON HORST

sound designer

RAE KING

CHALLENGES & TAKEAWAYS

I spent the latter half of spring semester junior year preparing to bring a student crew to Georgia to shoot an intimate drama with 2 child actors over a 16-day period. Mostly, my work covered travel and accommodations, line producing, and accounting for the safety hazards of a set build, a pool scene, and sweltering exteriors.

I created 23 separate transportation itineraries to account for staggered call times, different origin airports, and different ground transportation and housing scenarios. The talent stayed at a hotel. The crew crashed at the director’s parents’ home, which had to be reorganized every other night to prep for the next shoot. Each room we shot in had to be carefully stripped of furniture, re-wallpapered with shelf liner atop a layer of paper tape, prop dusted, and graffitied to resemble an unfinished house during the 2009 recession. And every crew member had to have a place to sleep. Besides the art-heavy set builds, I also had to safety-proof a pool scene, a couple of sweltering exteriors, a scene with the 10-year-old hammering drywall, multiple staged falls, and running scenes with trip hazards.

My greatest challenge on this project was not the extensive prep work but the challenge of being present and hospitable while also doing 20 things at once. Make sure everyone is hydrated. Keep the moms at bay. Keep the kids psyched. Vibe check the crew every 10 minutes. Have dinner ready on time and plan your ingredients out 3 meals ahead. Stay under budget. This became especially hard after my co-producer had to leave on day 5 due to an emergency. The experience taught me to staff my own department as well as everyone else’s.

Although the two weeks of production stretched me thin, the impeccable morale kept me going. It felt like summer camp - and it was, by design.

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  • All Night Long

    written and directed by MICHAEL KLUBECK

    The relationship between two best friends is tested as they prepare to compete in a National Dance Competition.

    AWARDS

    REMI WINNER,

    Worldfest Houston International Film Festival (2020)

    OFFICIAL SELECTION,

    First Run Film Festival (2020)

    CREDITS

    starring

    NOAH MUTTERPERL
    & BENJAMIN GOTTESMAN

    writer/director

    MICHAEL KLUBECK

    producers

    MYSELF,
    SIMON GEISKER
    HEATHER VAXER,
    & ANNE SWENSON

    director of photography

    HENRY DACOSTA

    1st assistant director

    SIMON GEISKER

    2nd assistant director

    FELICIA SOBHANI

    unit production manager

    AUDREY ROH

    casting director

    KAMERON MILLS

    gaffer

    JOSH CHAROW

    key grip

    IDIL ERYUREKLI

    grips

    EMMET LUCIANO,
    MATT IACONO,
    TAYLOR BISSEY,
    & TOM INGWERSEN

    1st a.c.

    DERIN EGRIKAVUK

    2nd a.c.

    MATT KAUFMAN
    & HANA KIM

    sound mixer

    KRISTAL SALAZAR

    production designer

    BRIA JOSEPHS

    art director

    KATHRYN AMAN

    hair & makeup

    TATUM DORRELL

    costume designer

    MARGARITA HERRERA

    script supervisor

    SARAH NOCQUET
    & HAINA ZHOU

    choreographer

    CELINE ABDALLAH

    production assistants

    BENJY BERKOWITZ
    & EFFIE OGINO

    CHALLENGES & TAKEAWAYS

    This project had a larger scope than projects I’d previously worked on at NYU. As the lead physical producer, I oversaw everything logistical from checkouts to returns. Because there were so many moving parts, I had the opportunity to delegate meals, hotel booking, and the shepherding of extras to my U.P.M. and 2nd A.D., and I was able to focus more on the big picture rather than set gofering.

    There were a lot of locations, including a historic movie theater, a high school, a home exterior in Staten Island, a dance studio, and a retro diner. This made for a tight schedule with lots of moves.

    One of the trickier things I had to do for this film was find a picture car from the 1980s for a driving scene and devise a workaround to NYU’s tricky, auto-omitting insurance policy. The director wanted to see the actor driving, but NYU wouldn't allow it. In the end, I appealed to NYU Risk Management with a plan that involved the actor driving the car only 10 unobstructed feet for an exterior wide shot and utilizing poor man’s process for the rest of the scene. The plan was approved, I found a studio in Greenpoint with workable rates, and I coaxed the director into sacrificing a smidge of his vision.

    My biggest takeaways from this project were that I became better at delegating and better at making the initial contact. I secured 4 locations on my own, and I was the primary contact for all of the location owners, plus the picture car owner. I had to delegate the more tedious tasks because I had to be present in case any one of the moving parts stopped working and a creative solution was needed.

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  • Oh Yeah

    written and directed by LILENA MARINOU

    Oh Yeah is an open letter from a young woman who describes her coming-of-sexual age in exploring how to give pleasure to herself and eventually allowing others to join her in doing so too. Above all, it is an ode to the lightheartedness of sexuality through the discovery that the body is very much like a playground, a place where sex can be playful.

    AWARDS

    Semi-Finalist

    Student Academy Awards (2020)

    Best Director - Female

    Indie Short Fest (2019)

    Finalist - Cinematography

    ARFF Barcelona (2019)

    SELECTIONS

    National Film Festival for Talented Youth

    Thessaloniki Queer Arts Festival

    London Greek Film Festival

    Tokyo Lift-Off Film Festival

    Phoenix Film Festival

    New Jersey International Film Festival

    Treasure Island International Film Festival

    Carmarthen Bay Film Festival

    CREDITS

    starring

    MAIYA PASCOUCHE,
    QIMANI WALKER,
    & ANDREA PEREZ

    narration by

    ELISABETH LIGONNET LAM

    writer/director

    LILENA MARINOU

    producers

    MYSELF,
    KARA BARTEK,
    & LILENA MARINOU

    director of photography

    MARTIN BLANCO

    1st assistant director

    STEPHANIE LEMESIANOU

    1st a.c.

    MORGAN GARDINER

    2nd a.c.

    SINCLAIR NEFF

    steadicam op

    JESSE BRONSTEIN

    gaffer

    LUC UNG

    key grip

    SAMON SIRIPANICHGON

    production designer

    DANNIE PETROVNA GIGLEVITCH


    editor & colorist

    LILENA MARINOU

    composer

    THEO SHIER

    CHALLENGES & TAKEAWAYS

    This was the first NYU film that I produced - fall semester, sophomore year - and it laid the groundwork for me. It was a small, friendly, synergistic team, and every crew member had a special connection to the project. Which - considering the abundance of ego in NYU film - was a miracle for being my first producing endeavor.

    We shot this film in 2 days - one day at a neighborhood park, requiring a permit, and one day at my co-producer’s house. The script called for a merry-go-round and a seesaw, which was tricky, because the city banned merry-go-rounds and seesaws about 10 years ago. We scoured the tristate area and finally found a traditional merry-go-round in Islip, Long Island. We outsourced the construction of a seesaw.

    My co-producer, Kara Bartek, took the lead on this project. Mainly, I was at the ready to relieve her of tedious tasks and to absorb her knowledge. I took care of the catering. I was also the travel captain. I discovered that the U.P.M. role is very important when dietary restrictions figure prominently in your crew.

    My biggest challenge on this project was dealing with a Long Island mom at the park who kept sending her kids into our frame. I asked her nicely twice to please respect us - and if not us, then our permit - but she did not believe that we had a permit, and she called the police. I almost lost my temper. I backed off. We waited for the police to come, showed them our permit, and nodded politely when they told us that our permit didn’t allow us exclusive access to the merry-go-round. I learned that there are always going to be uncontrollable factors when you are shooting in a public space, even if you’ve cleared your shoot with the town government. We could have cleared it with the neighborhood board or posted signs in the days leading up to our shoot. Not that any of these steps would have prevented the sabotage, but they may have given us a little more control.

    In spite of the holdup, the film got finished and has performed incredibly well at festivals. This is 100% to Lilena Marinou's credit. My biggest takeaway from this project was that I seek out passionate, goodhearted directors, and I prioritize the synergy of the crew. Since then, all of my productions have been efficient and good-vibey.

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  • Meet the Neighbors

    written and directed by DERIN EGRIKAVUK

    A story about two women whose stories connect in a moment with a shared look. When Dylan peeks into the neighbors’ window, she becomes an unwanted witness to a murder committed by pregnant Marlo, who must now cover her tracks or risk losing her unborn child.

    STATUS

    post-production

    CREDITS

    starring

    MADI MITTS,
    ORLANDO CINTRON JR.,
    CAMPBELL SYMES,
    & AARON KHEIFETS

    writer/director

    DERIN EGRIKAVUK

    producers

    MYSELF,
    ALEXANDER ZINN
    PINAR BINAY,
    & SOFIA BARA

    director of photography

    HENRY DACOSTA

    1st assistant director

    DANNIE PETROVNA GIGLEVITCH

    unit production manager

    JAAP DEINUM

    1st a.c.

    LUC UNG

    2nd a.c.

    ALLIE IACONO

    gaffer

    IDIL ERYUREKLI

    key grip

    MATT IACONO

    best electric

    ISABEL PADILLA

    camera/g&e swing

    MATT CHIARELLI

    sound mixers

    CHANCE BORDEN GRAY
    & ELIAS RIVERA

    boom operators

    NACHIKETH BHATTATHIRI
    & GEORGE PAPAZOV

    production designer

    BRIA JOSEPHS

    art director

    GRANT HIRSCH

    hair & makeup

    ZOYA GHAZI

    script supervisors

    KAYLYNN PARKS
    & ISABELLE PERKINS

    stunt coordinator

    TRAVIS STATON-MARRERO

    animal wrangler

    SHELBY LIU

    CHALLENGES & TAKEAWAYS

    This was the first film that I lead produced but was not on set for. It was difficult for me to find an equal to pass the wand to, especially because this production happened over Thanksgiving and all of my usual picks had gone home. I found two versatile sophomores to team up on line producing and unit production management, and I didn’t hear from them for the first 12 hours - a surprise to me, but it spoke to the effectiveness of my prep.

    We shot for 2 days in Brooklyn in an AirBnb, a bodega, and on a sidewalk. The first immediate challenge I encountered was unexpected snow on our bodega/sidewalk day. We had already arranged for holding inside of the bodega, but the crew shooting at the ATM around the corner would need a heat tent. So, I arranged for that remotely.

    Additionally, I had to account for various safety risks - prop knives, a live dog, a sidewalk exterior, and some action on a fire escape. There is a lot of tedious work involved in detailing safety plans for NYU Risk Management, and my co-producers were heavily committed to other projects, so I prioritized and delegated as best I could in order to gain COIs in time for checkouts.

    On the day before checkouts, my Murphy’s Law sense started tingling, and I decided to call Budget to make sure that our truck reservation, which had been booked weeks in advance, was still set. I found out that a stranger had used my name to pick it up a few days prior - by some glitch in the system - and Budget no longer had a reservation on file for me. With one remaining hour in the business day, I had to find a truck rental company that accepted NYU’s insurance and had the size truck we needed.

    My biggest takeaways from this production were time management and remote problem-solving. Passing the wand and being absent for physical production was tough, but it was a milestone on my journey to becoming a professional producer.

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  • Techno Scrap

    written and directed by JULIAN ALVAREZ

    Techno Scrap follows M0, a mute robotic farmhand who develops an obsession with physical connection after receiving a hug from his owner's daughter.

    STATUS

    post-production

    AWARDS

    Filmmaker First Grant

    Pond5 (2018)

    CREDITS

    starring

    LARRY PETERSEN,
    DANIELLA CHARLTON,
    JAZMYN CHARLTON,
    & AMAREE CHARLTON

    writer/director

    JULIAN ALVAREZ

    producers

    KARA BARTEK
    & MYSELF

    director of photography

    STEFAN NACHMANN

    casting director

    MONIQUE SIMMON

    1st assistant director

    EMMI SHOCKLEY

    1st a.c.

    SARAH GOLD

    2nd a.c.

    SAMON SIRIPANICHGON

    key grip

    DANIEL CHO

    gaffer

    MICHAEL CONG

    best electric

    JOHN ZENG

    BBG

    EMMET LUCIANO

    sound mixer

    JAIRO GARCIA

    boom operator

    SAM HAMILTON

    production designer

    BRIANNA BURKE

    costume designer

    BRENNA LEAVER

    script supervisor

    JOSH WHALEN

    animal wrangler

    JOCELYN BENNETT

    CHALLENGES & TAKEAWAYS

    Spring semester sophomore year, this was my first thesis film production. Kara Bartek took me under her wing again (we had previously teamed up on Oh Yeah) to co-produce this eerie AI drama on an AirBnb farm in northern Connecticut.

    This was a 6-day shoot, bookended by 2 travel days. We were immediately struck by unexpected challenges. Firstly, our DP broke his leg the day before checkouts. Then, on the morning of our first shoot day, we awoke to a foot of snow. The ACs had to compensate for the DP’s lack of mobility, and we had to be extra aware of the icy surfaces, stalling his next hospital visit to the best of our ability.

    It was extremely cold in the barn that we shot much of the film in. This affected the crew’s efficiency. G&E had to account for the electrical challenges of working in snow. The cold caused our prop glass to fail. We quickly fell behind schedule. By day 4, we were looking at a compromise that involved cramming an entire day and a half into our final shoot day.

    These schedule compromises culminated in the core braintrust - the director, the producers, the A.D., the sound mixer, and the director’s roommate - working through lunch on day 6 to prep the final exterior scene. Pure grit and a will to beat the sunset drove us to spend our 30 minute break digging a grave in the frozen ground while everyone else was inside eating fish and chips.

    Scheduling was undoubtedly the biggest challenge on this project. NYU requires 1 break day for shoots longer than 6 days, and we couldn’t afford to stretch the budget any thinner, and we couldn’t ask the unpaid student crew to scrap it in close quarters for longer than 6 days. We had to make the film in 6 days. I learned to trust the A.D.’s scheduling calls.

    My biggest takeaways from this project were practical weather-proofing knowledge, familiarity with the budget needs of a travel shoot, and the importance of keeping your crew comfortable. I also became very confident in asking businesses for discounts and donations. Most of our meals were discounted. We’ll have a lot of special thanks to put in the end credits.

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